The Humble Swallow

28 June 2017

Interview and thoughts Fenn O'Meally.
Introduction Hedvig Werner

"In everyone you meet there’s a landscape of stories they could tell you - stories that shape the facets of their future, the people of their past and the state of their presence. Like that of the story of how I met Solomon Golding.”

Following an interview with Solomon Golding by Cecilie Harris in print issue 12 ‘Young Hearts’, filmmaker Fenn O’Meally ventured out on a mission to dig deeper into the character that is Solomon. They spoke about role model Carlos Acosta, a Cuban ballet dancer, and how he helped plough the way for a dancer such as Solomon to be the first black British ballet dancer at the Royal Ballet. “There hadn’t been a dancer like Carlos Acosta before he had come along.” He expresses a positive outlook on the future of ballet. “Times have really changed within ballet. It’s a lot more colourful.”

"I am a filmmaker, a female filmmaker. I started life in this industry as what was termed a ‘budding journalist’. I have always been driven by the notion of unearthing the hidden facets of another’s novel; a novel like Solomon’s. When I met Solomon we clicked, the kind of click that only siblings can master. Weirdly I felt like I’d known him for the two decades that constitute my life."

Solomon Golding is a profoundly passionate human being breaking down old barriers. He is however modest about his position, a truly graceful ballet dancer in all ways imaginable. Although he speaks highly of previous pioneers, he his now also joining the ranks as a role model for future hopeful talents. It’s important that his words are out there - inspiring those who might be discouraged to follow their dreams out of fear of not being accepted. “It’s everyone’s. It doesn’t just belong to a certain few. I’m just excited to see what happens in the future.” And that is how Solomon sees ballet, “it’s everyone’s”.

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